TwentyFifth Time

August 29, 2009 at 8:13 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , )

This last couple of weeks has been a bit of greatness and a bit a crap, if I’m honest.

We’ll do the crap first: I won’t go into any details here, but I’ve been involved in discussions with Ghostwriter Publications regarding what I see as outstanding items owed to me, and the discussions have left a somewhat unpleasant taste in my mouth. I’m sad to say that they haven’t been particularly fruitful from my point of view and whilst I’m relatively sanguine about it all, it has confirmed that my decision to stop working with GWP, and it’s director Neil Jackson, was entirely the right one. It came to the point where I had to make a simple decision:  do I chase GWP through the courts, or do I let it go? Do I have the time or, indeed, the inclination? And even if I have the time , is my time worth wasting in having to carry on dealing with someone I can longer trust. And the answer is no; the situation, apart from being mostly boring, isn’t worth the effort it’ll take, not really, because I have more exciting things to do. I’ll take what Neil has agreed he owes me (assuming it arrives soon) and then I can walk away from this whole sorry mess. So, the final thing I’ll say about it all is this: I appreciate that the situation is specific to Neil and me, and I hope that his relationship and dealings with his other authors don’t turn out like mine and his did, but to anyone thinking of getting involved with GWP I would advise great caution.

On to bigger and brighter things: the cover artist for my Ash Tree Press collection has been confirmed as Jason van Hollander! Jason is a World Fantasy Award-winning artist whose covers have graced a number of other Ash Tree books – his covers for their anthologies are simply stunning. Jason’s website is here: http://www.jasonvanhollander.com/index.html – go and be astounded. At this point I have no idea what Jason will do for Lost Places but I’m absolutely sure it’ll be superb. I’m not sure if I’m supposed to make suggestions, because (let’s face it) when you have an artist the calibre of Jason van Hollander doing your cover, you just basically say “Whatever you want to do. Sir.” I can’t wait to see what he comes up with, and if Jason says he want to draw a picture of a daffodil wearing a trilby, who am I to argue? Hope he doesn’t, though…

Other news: I’ve rewritten the novel chapters and submitted them and I’m much, much happier with them. I editing them down by around 20%, and then slotted in some new supernatural gubbins, and the finished piece flows far better and faster. Clearly, I have no idea if they’re what the publisher’s looking for, but I can hope! I know I’m not going to hear back about them for a while, so I may well carry on with the next chapters, or spend some time with a new story I want to write about a plague of swearing. Watch this space.

Reviews

The first review this week is of the GWP anthology Creature Feature. Now, the first thing to say is that I’m a little biased about Creature Feature because a) I’m in it but b) my relationship with GWP isn’t great. In the interests of fairness, I’ll state straight up that the stories in this anthology are mostly wonderful, smart pulp creature stories that deserve to be read by as many people as possible, the cover’s eyecatching (although it’s slightly grainier than it looked in pictures posted of it on facebook and the GWP website) and it seems well bound. Creature Feature’s big problem is that  whoever proofread  it did a very poor job – it’s got quite a few basic typographical errors in it. The most glaring example occurs in Neil’s introduction, when he talks about Willie Meikle and Guy N Smith and then says that “These three gentlemen…” One might almost imagine that a third person was removed from the intro at the last minute but that no one bothered to read the rest of it to correct it for errors… It’s a shame because these kind of little things can affect the reading of the stories and can be taken to show, I think, a lack of respect for both the paying customer and the authors involved. Still, overall, it’s a good book and I’d certainly recommend it.

Full review next week, but I’m also reading Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, which I’m enjoying hugely. Of course, it has nothing to do with the fact that Chabon and I are soon to be ‘bookmates’, as we both have stories in the forthcoming Lovecraft Unbound anthology…

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TwentyFourth Time

August 18, 2009 at 7:02 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , )

It’s funny, how life turns itself around, isn’t it?

NOTE: I warn you now that there’s good news coming, so everyone who enjoyed the relative solemnity of last week’s blog and was hoping for another week of non-chirpiness, turn away now. There’s a huge wave of good cheer coming, it’s top foaming white. Depressives are surfing it’s tubular length – look, one just fell in and drowned! Should we worry? No, fuck them, let’s get on!

So, anyway, good news: I am to have an Ash Tree Press collection! An ASH TREE PRESS collection! YEAH!

What happened was this: I was already in conversation with ATP (see how easy I slip into the jargon? I’m almost a natural) about pitching them a second collection – I had several stories ready to go, some that I thought I could work into shape and some ideas that I hoped they’d like. Barbara and Chris and I met at World Fantasy 2009 in Calgary and got on well, so most of the conversations had been more along friendly lines rather than anything formal, but things looked hopeful in the sense that they were at least happy for me to pitch. After making my decision about Ghostwriter (and thanks for all the messages of support that came in about that, by the way – much appreciated), Barbara and I had a chat about the newly free stories. I didn’t think they’d be interested, they said they were, and Bob’s your aunty’s live-in lover, suddenly I have a viable pitch. I sent along the new stories, plus some that had been intended for the GWP mini-collection we’d planned for Christmas, and a few days later ATP got back in touch to formally offer me a collection. The full listing for this masterpiece (I’m nothing if not slightly egotistical and very hopeful), which we’re calling Lost Places, is:

Haunting Marley
The Animal Game
A Meeting of Gemmologists
The Baking of Cakes
Station Waiting Room
The Pennine Tower Restaurant
A Different Morecambe
The Lemon in the Pool
Where Cats Go
Stevie’s Duck
The Church on the Island
When the World Goes Quiet
Old Man’s Pantry
The Derwentwater Shark
Flappy the Bat
Scucca
Forest Lodge
An Afternoon With Danny
 
We haven’t sorted out the order yet and one story needed revising (which I’ve done), so now I need to redo the acknowledgements and story notes, but the plan is to have the collection out in time for World Horror 2010! How cool is that? I’m enormously excited by this development. ATP, as well as giving me my publishing break, are one of my favourite small presses (and certainly are the one most in tune with my personal preferences for reading material), and I always hoped that one day I might get an ATP collection of my own. It’s still a disappointment the way Ghostwriter turned out, but this more than makes up for it. In fact, I genuinely couldn’t hope for a better result. My own hardback ATP collection, with a title I like (I know it’s similar to the planned Ghostwriter title, but I came up with that and always liked it – especially the Lost Places part, which seems to sum up my fiction best of all. It’s all about lost places, and finding them even if you don’t want to…). As you might have noticed, we’ve dropped 2 stories from the Ghostwriter collection and added in 10 more, including some of my most recent writing and a couple of older pieces of which I’m hugely proud (well, okay, I’m proud of all of them, but there are some things you particularly want to see in print for entirely personal reasons, and a number of stories in Lost Places fit into that category).
 
Should I stop going on now?
 
No? Okay. Well, the other piece of news this week is that Gollancz ‘aren’t grabbed’ by the novel chapters I sent them. Now, this may on the face of it seem to be bad news but it’s not, because when i reread the chapters, you know what I found? They’re right. The chapters are dull. Turgid, even. What’s good, though (before you badnewsniks get all excited) is that they’ve given me some feedback and a chance to rewrite them. So, now I’m in serious Chop and Change mode, and trying to remember my new golden adage: Stop Trying To Impress With Your Writerly Skills And Get On With The Story!
 
Did I mention, by the way, that I have an Ash Tree Press collection of my stories out in time for March 2010? I did. Good. Wouldn’t want that news to slip by unnoticed!
 
Right. Time to do some work…
 

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Twentythird Time

August 8, 2009 at 7:13 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , )

Black Dogs and Lost Places is no more.

This is a strange blog to write, because for the first time I have little positive news and a fairly hefty piece of sad news. Now, that may please those of you who were getting a bit teeth-grindingly tired of how chirpy I can be, and of how positive and light most of what I write in this blog is, so to you I say: stick with it, here’s your darkness!

So, anyway, this week I took the difficult decision to withdraw my work from Ghostwriter Publications. This was far from a pleasant thing to do, and I spent a long time considering it and my other options and studying my contract before deciding to go ahead, but I honestly felt that I had reached the point where I had little choice. Ghostwriter is a new firm, and it has signed some excellent, talented and nice writers (some of whom I’m happy to be able to call, if not friends exactly then certainly friendly acquaintances who aren’t friends yet simply because I’ve not actually managed to get inside a room with them), but I was struggling more and more with how it was going about doing business. Ultimately, it boiled down to a simple clash of philosophies, with a very clear set of differing priorities developing between us. In the end, I came to the conclusion that our relationship was simply not viable, because I didn’t feel I could work with them effectively, and I’m sure Neil had started to think of me as an ego-driven diva (for the record, I’m not. Well, not much, although I am finally confident enough in the quality of my writing to be clear about what I want and how I expect it to be treated, and clear enough about how I expect people I’m working in partnership with to act). Practically, what this means is that Black Dogs and Lost Places is no more, and the other proposed work (the Strange Gateways mini collection and the possible novel next year) won’t come out either, which is a shame. And I won’t get to use the cover Neil came up with, or have my launch and signing at FCon, but that does mean I can go along to that particular weekend and not worry about anything. So, beer and insanity for the whole 48 hours it is then… Of course, I’m still linked in to Ghostwriter because of my stories in Creature Feature, although Neil tells me he’ll remove them from any new print runs which isn’t particularly what I wanted but is, of course, his right as editor and overall boss of Ghostwriter. I hope to receive my contributor copies of Creature Feature this weekend, and I’m looking forward to reading it. I hope that Ghostwriter sorts itself out, because it would be a huge shame if it didn’t, and I wish the company and especially all the authors still involved it all the best with their future endeavours.

So, now I’m considering my options. I’ve spent so long (just shy of a year – okay, it’s not that long but it’s still quite a chunk of time) considering and working on Black Dogs that it feels very odd to think it no longer exists even in potentia. Its definitely sad, but it’s not entirely bad news. Clearly, I hope that I can interest another company in working with me on a collection and whatever I produce can include some of the more recent stuff that I’ve been doing, but honestly, at this point, I think I’m going to sit back and take a breather for a few days. A lot’s happening for me at the moment (new jobs, rapidly growing children, just life generally) that I’m going to enjoy just writing for writing’s sake again. I’ll concentrate just on enjoying the stories for a bit – after all, its what got me into this game in the first place.

Having said all that, I did manage to complete one story in draft, the long-delayed animals tale that I originally wrote longhand on holiday and which has been lurking in my notebook and daring me to type it up ever since. I had a couple of train journeys this week, so used them to get that particular joy sorted, and the result is pretty good I think – certainly, initial feedback is positive, anyway. It still needs a polish, and I want to add some detail about scorpions and spiders (Wikipedia here I come! fuck accuracy, I like simple user interfaces!) but then it should be ready to unleash it on the big, wide world. Watch this space…

No reviews. Still too lazy and been a bit distracted with sorting the Ghostwriter stuff out. Promise I’ll do some soon. Honest.

Okay, Lords and Ladies, that;s your lot. Go back to whatever you were doing, there’s nothing more to see here…

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Twentysecond Time

July 25, 2009 at 7:03 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , )

And we continue apace…

This week, Ghostwriter Publications head honcho Neil J sent me a proposed cover for the collection, Black Dogs and Lost PLaces, which (after some back and forth tinkering) I like very much. It incorporates everything I asked for (nothing too gothic, a doorhandle and lock, creepy overtones without being overtly horrific or too pulp – I’ve said before and stand by the fact that I love pulp writing, but I’m not sure I write pulp so I didn’t want a pulp cover). The end result is, I think you’ll agree, really rather special:

Black Dogs and Lost Places

Black Dogs and Lost Places

I’m getting all tingly again just looking at it… Spurred on by the arrival of my cover, I also finished proofing the galley, which is now done. Acknowledgements, Barbara Roden’s introduction, the stories themselves and the afterword are all now proofed and in the post back to Neil.

I’d just tlike to point out, if you hadn’t already noticed, that I have a rather lovely blurb by Stephen Volk. BAFTA award-winning Stephen Volk. Ghostwatch and Afterlife author Stephen Volk. How cool is that?

Did I mention it was Stephen Volk? I did. Oh. Never mind. Stephen Volk! Fantastic!

Anyway, work on the collection is progressing nicely, and as I get more news about its appearance, I’ll blog about it here and on facebook (probably at nauseating length, boring everyone senseless, but you know what? I don’t care. It’s my first collection and I’ll bore you about it if I want to).

I’ve been thinking a lot about the writing generally this week. I finished another story (which is either a complete piece of junk or really quite good, I can’t work it out), and I have several plans that I’m going to start work on in the next few months. None of them are specific enough for me to blog about yet, but rest assured when they are, I will! I have decided one thing, however: given that there are currently no specific anthologies for me to write/submit to, so this might be a good time to start work on the long-discussed novel. Ages ago, I submitted the first few chapters of a novel to a mainstream publisher for consideration and although I haven’t heard back from them yet, I reread the chapters and have decided that I like them a lot. So, my decision is to start seriously writing the novel. I’m certainly not stopping writing the short stories – I enjoy them too much to leave them alone, and suspect that they act as something of a safety valve for me, but I’d like to get my teeth into something more substantial now. Of course, if I get requests to submit to specific anthologies, I’ll still do it (partly because I love writing the shorts, but also because being in multi-author anthologies is fun and it’s always nice to be in company!), and I’ll certainly want to put out another collection of stories at some point if I can, but now it’s novel time. Time to imperil the world, I think…

Only other news is that I have someone building a website for me – at last! My friend Andrew has been putting something together and we’ve spent the past week sending photos to each other, discussing colours and fonts and arcane computer progams, searching out copyright free images that we can use, etc. Anyone know a good site for old woodcuts that are copyright free incidentally? I have some but I want more!! We’re hoping to get the site ready to launch in the next few weeks, so watch this space…

Still no reviews. I’m being lazy.

Right, off again. Later, one and all!

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Twentieth Time

July 12, 2009 at 7:41 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , )

Aw, my blog is twenty posts old – if it gets to 21, do I have to buy it a car or something?

Two pieces of news this week. The first I’ve been sitting on for ages but haven’t been able to post about at the editor’s request. However, he’s put details on his site, so I figure it must be okay to shout about it. I’m incredibly pleased to announce that Church on the Island has been picked for Steve Jones’  Very Best of Best New Horror . This is being released in a limited edition hardback signed by all the contributors, and then a normal paperback (out in 2010, I think). This is a huge honour, especially when you look at the full contents:

INTRODUCTION: BETTERING THE BEST  Ramsey Campbell
NO SHARKS IN THE MED  Brian Lumley
THE MAN WHO DREW CATS  Michael Marshall Smith
THE SAME IN ANY LANGUAGE  Ramsey Campbell
NORMAN WISDOM AND THE ANGEL OF DEATH Christopher Fowler
MEFISTO IN ONYX  Harlan Ellison
THE TEMPTATION OF DR STEIN  Paul J. McAuley
QUEEN OF KNIVES  Neil Gaiman
THE BREAK  Terry Lamsley
EMPTINESS SPOKE ELOQUENT Caitlín R Kiernan
MR. CLUBB AND MR. CUFF  Peter Straub
WHITE  Tim Lebbon
THE OTHER SIDE OF MIDNIGHT: ANNO DRACULA, 1981   Kim Newman
CLEOPATRA BRIMSTONE  Elizabeth Hand
20TH CENTURY GHOST  Joe Hill
THE WHITE HANDS  Mark Samuels
MY DEATH  Lisa Tuttle
HAECKEL’S TALE  Clive Barker
DEVIL’S SMILE  Glen Hirshberg
THE CHURCH ON THE ISLAND  Simon Kurt Unsworth
THE NEW YORK TIMES AT SPECIAL BARGAIN RATES  Stephen King
Very Best of Best New Horror cover

Very Best of Best New Horror cover

I mean, Holy GOD! I’m in an anthology with Clive Barker, Peter Straub and Stephen King! STEPHEN KING! Details of the antho can be found on the second page of the Coming Soon section of Stephen Jones’ website (link below). To be considered the author of one of the best 20 stories from a collection that has printed something like 250 stories over the years is really quite fantastic, and means my head has swelled even more than normal…

The other news this week is that the final contents list for the excellent-looking Gaslight Grotesque anthology has been released. There’s some people I don’t know in there, which is really good, but also contributions from Barbara Roden, Mark Morris, Stephen Volk, Willie Miekle, Jeff Campbell and GWP editor Neil Jackson (in his first story sale – way to go Neil!) The full listing is:

 

Foreword: Tales of Terror & Mystery by Leslie S. Klinger
Introduction by Charles V. Prepolec

Hounded by Stephen Volk
The Death Lantern by Lawrence C. Connolly
The Quality of Mercy by William Meikle
Emily’s Kiss by James A. Moore
The Tragic Case of the Child Prodigy by William Patrick Maynard
The Last Windigo by Hayden Trenholm
Celeste by Neil Jackson
The Best Laid Plans by Robert Lauderdale
Exalted Are the Forces of Darkness by Leigh Blackmore
The Affair of the Heart by Mark Morris
The Hand Delivered Letter by Simon K. Unsworth
Of the Origin of the Hound of the Baskervilles by Barbara Roden
Mr. Other’s Children by J.R. Campbell

Gaslight Grotesque is available to preorder from Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk (and, as an aside, Creature Feature is also available through amazon.co.uk).

Okay, that’s pretty much it for today. May have reviews next week, or news on new writing – the mysterious fruit story stalled this week (as did all writing-related stuff because, basically, I couldn’t be bothered) but will hopefully be done by the end of the week. I’m also aiming to type up/redraft the ‘people into animals’ story, plus I have ideas for a new tale or two I want to start on. Soon, Lords and Ladies. Soon.

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Nineteenth Time

July 4, 2009 at 7:45 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , )

…and I’m back! Now, where was I? Oh yeah, writing.

Well, there’s not much to report, really. My writing diary is, for the first time in a while, entirely empty of specific jobs, so I can write pretty much what I want. I didn’t take my laptop on holiday (I normally write on the laptop, because it’s quicker) but I did have a notebook and pen with me so I wrote a new story sitting in the Moraira sun – I went away with three stories in my head, and wrote the one that presented itself most forcefully, about a self help group whose members are really struggling with their identity. Even longhand, the story shelled out nice and easy, and although there’s some sections that still need work, I’m confident it’ll be a good little tale when it’s done I just need to type it up now… The last story I wrote completely longhand was The Church on the Island, so I have pedigree here ha ha ha!

One thing that did happen on holiday was that another story presented itself to me, and as is traditional for me, it started out as a joke. We had a series of strange incidents on holiday with fruit and vegetable appearing in the villa pool (this is true: we had a tomato, a courgette, a lemon and three large green peppers appear in the water during the course of the week, probably thrown in by the children in the adjoining villa as a kind of weird joke), and my wife, parents and sister all said at some point, Well I’m sure there’s a story in there, Simon! and everyone laughs…except me. Partly, it was the challenge – sort of, Well, you’re all joking but I wonder, can I write a story about fruit appearing in a pool that’s dark and not funny? Creepy not silly? Yes, I think so. And partly, I think it was because it’s such a strange thing to happen that I wanted to record it in some way. So,  I came back with a kind of proto-idea bubbling in my brain, and worked out more details over the last week. What’s great is that other details have been swirling into place without me trying. For example, Helen Grant (excellent author and facebook friend) was messing about with redcurrants this week, so suddenly I have another fruit, and my main character has a name, and with the name comes a history (not Helen’s history, I hasten to add – I’ve nicked her name but not her whole life!). I started the story on Thursday, and I aim to have it done by the end of the week. I don’t have a place in mind for it, I’m just writing it for fun, and we’ll see how it turns out. More news as it happens.

One more thing: as you may know (I’ve banged on about it often enough!) Ghostwriter Publications publishes 2 chapbooks of mine, Button and Marley’s Haunting -a weird little thing about the perils of sticky buttons and a clasically inspired, vicious ghost story respectively. I have several copies of each available for sale direct from me, each one signed in lovely violet in by yours truly! They’re at the bargain price of £2.50 including postage – surely a dream purchase in anyone’s book! If you’re interested, contact me and we’ll sort out payment via paypal or cheque and delivery.

Quick request – anyone good at designing websites? I finally got round to buying the rights to www.simonkurtunsworth.com, but I haven’t got the first clue about building the site, etc. Anyone got any ideas, or fancy doing me a freebie??? I’d be eternally grateful…

No reviews this week – have several to write up for next week though, so watch this space. Right, life calls. Later, lords and ladies.

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Eighteenth Time

June 17, 2009 at 2:58 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

As I’m going on holiday, I’m doing this blog post a little earlier in the week than normal. I thought that before a break might be a good time to take stock, to work out where I’ve been and am going, and to see precisely where I am now.

It’s been a hell of a year. I found out in August 2008 that The Church on the Island had been nominated for a World Fantasy Award for best short story, and things haven’t stopped since then. I got a publishing company interested in doing a collection of my work (and then more than interested, in that they agreed to do it) I went out to Calgary for the World Fantasy Convention (where i met some excellent people and made friends with some folk whom I’m hoping I’ll know for a long time yet, even if I didn’t win the award), I’ve had 6 stories accepted for publication in different anthologies and I’ve submitted a novel proposal to a major publishing house. So, where does that leave me?

Mammoth Book of Best New Horror #19

Mammoth Book of Best New Horror #19

Well, Church on the Island was included in the Mammoth Book of Best New Horror #19, which is pretty good, and I did my first signing sat next to an author whose work I love, Christopher Fowler (at FCon, if you’re interested). I was on a high for days afterwards!

 

 

 

 

 

Creature Feature approaches!

Creature Feature approaches!

Creature Feature (as you may or may not be aware, but if you’ve read this blog before you will be aware!) comes out in the next couple of weeks and contains 3 of my stories (Day Ten, Last Option and Peek A Boo), as well as 18 other tales of giant, wild creatures and other pulp delights.

 

 

Gaslight Grotesque: Nightmare Tales Of Sherlock Holmes, containing my story The Hand Delivered Letter is scheduled to come out in November of this year – this is a particularly gratifying acceptance for me, as it was the first time that I’ve written using someone else’s world and/or characters (in this case, Conan Doyle’s

Gaslight Grotesque

Gaslight Grotesque

Sherlock Holmes). It was a huge test for me as a writer, I think, both in terms of how to do it and also, could I do it at all? When you read the story, you’ll see that I’ve not written a ‘traditional’ Holmes story, because I felt I didn’t know the originals well enough to do them justice, but I’m hoping that what iIhave produced doesn’t let the side down.

 

 

 

My story Vernon, Driving is being published in the Ellen Datlow anthology Lovecraft Unbound, due for publication in October.

Lovecraft Unbound

Lovecraft Unbound

When I tell you that this was the 4th story I submitted to Ellen for this particular anthology, the first three having been rejected, you’ll maybe have some inkling of how proud I am to have finally made the cut. The other contributors to Lovecraft Unbound are a high-powered and well-regarded bunch, and you might ask yourself the question, what am I doing in there? Keeping my head down! is the answer, and hoping no one notices the interloper…

And, lastly on the anthlogies front, it is my huge pleasure to announce that the Zambia story (Mami Wata) has been accepted for inclusion in the forthcoming Ash Tree Press anthology Exotic Gothic 3. Again, having seen the lineup of other authors involved, you might wonder how the hell I got in there. Me, too, folks, me too! I’m not complaining, though…

As for other works, the collection Black Dogs and Lost Places is still set for a September release (we’ve had confirmation that we can launch at the British Fantasy Convention, so although this isn’t arranged yet, my hope is that this will happen and I’ll see you there!). It contains 10 stories, of which 6 are new and 4 reprints, and advance word via the blurbs I’ve had are simply astounding. Mark Morris has described it as “emotionally devasting” and the work of a “powerful new voice in horror”, Stephen Volk has said the stories are “creepy and impressive”, Lawrence Connolly that it is “the most impressive debut [he's read] for a long time”, Rob Shearman that the stories are “deceptively amiable, but creepy as hell” and Gary McMahon that I’m a “writer who knows the value of [his] craft”. Jesus! I thought maybe people would like them, but this kind of feedback is simply beyond what I ever expected. It’s enormously gratifying, slightly scary and makes me think that Black Dogs is something I can be very proud of and that people may actually like it. We’ll see…

Strange Gateways, the mini collection (5 new stories) I’ve decided to put back until December, to give me chance to concentrate on Black Dogs, but it will definitely come out, and will be a limited edition of 100 numbered, signed paperbacks. It’ll probably be available for pre-order from about August. In addition to this, Ghostwriter Publications have also released two chapbooks by me, Button and Marley’s Haunting, both of which will also be available as audios soon and will also be included in an audio collection due later in the year. There may also be audios of Strange Gateways and Black Dogs, if you’re very lucky!

The novel I don’t know about yet. I’m still waiting…

It’s not been a year without it’s downsides (although, if I’m honest, not many) – I’ve been rejected from a few anthologies that I wanted to get into, and one major piece of work seems to have fallen through (or at least, gone very quiet), which is a shame. My personal circumstances have changed which might affect the writing in the future if I’m not careful – having to get a proper job is never pleasant, but the one I got is excellent and will still hopefully leave me time to write each week. Mostly, though, this year has been incredibly successful. As well as the writing, I’ve set up this blog and have managed to update it regularly, I’ve got a presence on facebook (fun) and twitter (sorta pointless as far as I can see!) and have purchased the domain name www.simonkurtunsworth.com – I’ll set the site itself up during the coming months. So, I’ve been efficient, written a huge amount, and am starting to feel like a real author now (whatever one of those buggers is!). But you know the most important thing?

I’m having fun. No more, no less, this is the most fun I’ve had for ages, and I hope to carry on like this for the forseeable future!

See you after the holiday, when I shall be refreshed, relaxed and full of new ideas. I hope…

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Seventeenth Time

June 13, 2009 at 7:14 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

A quiet week, all told. Most of the time, I’ve been tied up with non-writing stuff, so that main focus has been getting the Zambia story sorted. The original draft (once again expertly critiqued by the messers Duffy, Thorley, Worgan, et al) was submitted to Danel Olsen, who seemed to like it but had suggestions to make to improve it. Danel is a great editor, who makes really tight, smart comments about the text and explains why he’s making them (and, perhaps even more importantly, wasn’t pissy when I camended his comments to something I liked better or ignored them completely), so we spent a few days batting around various drafts before we came to an agreement on the absolute last, final verion of the tale that we both liked. It’s been fun, watching my story evolve further than I thought it would. Along the way, the name of the story has changed (from Copperbelt to Mami Wata) and it’s tightened up a good deal. Mami Wata is now a really good story, I think, and although I’m still not sure if it’s made it into Exotic Gothic 3, I’m really rather proud of it.

I also wrote a piece of flash fiction this week for a competition – a 500 word story. Now, any of you who’ve read my stuff will know that 500 words isn’t usually enough for me to get out of the starting blocks, because I am a windy bugger, but I did manage it. Honest. It probably helped that I only found out about the competition a day before the closing date, so I didn’t have time to worry – just blasted the piece out on a train to London, and editing on the train back 4 hours later. It’s been submitted, but I haven’t heard back yet, but even if it doesn’t place (a distinct possibility!), it was fun to do and I might be able to expand the it later. The two characters I created, Cheshire and Poe, have started something sparking in my brain and I might try to flesh out them and their universe at some point. They join an ever-growing group of demons and nightmares that I’m gathering together ( take a bow, Mr Kobe and Mr Twomouth!) who are standing in the wings. Dunno what I’ll do with them yet, but their time is coming…

Not much else to tell, really.  I’ve been editing  the stories for Strange Gateways, which continues to develop nicely – more news as I get it. Got some more really good advance feedback on the stories in Black Dogs and Lost Places from World Fantasy Award-winning (and Doctor Who scriptwriter) Rob Shearman and the excellent horror author Mark Morris, so that was really positive. I’m really beginning to think that Black Dogs might be a critical (and hopefully commercial!) success. I’ve also had it confirmed that we can launch it at the British Fantasy Convention in September, so if all goes to plan I’ll do some kind of launch/signing there – the weekend of the 19th – 21st September, folks! Put it in your diary…

Creature Feature - June 1st approaches!

Creature Feature - June 15th approaches!

Oh, yeah, don’t forget, Creature Feature is out on Monday and should ship from Ghostwriter this week some time. 21 tales of creature both large and small, but all ( I would imagine!) deeply vicious. Includes three of my tales, so worth a look in anyone’s book. If you still aren’t convinced, I’d urge you to watch the excellent trailer on youtube (where you can also find trailers for other Ghostwriter Publications forthcoming releases, including my own Black Dogs and Lost Places collection, due September 2009. Did I mention that already? Did I?).

Okay, that’s enough. Don’t want to overload you.

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Sixteenth Time

June 7, 2009 at 7:39 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )

A good week.

After pulling together a final version of the story for submission to Gaslight Grotesque (now entitled The Hand Delivered Letter, by the way), I sent it to Charles Prepolec and Jeff Campbell and then sat back to wait. Thankfully, Charles and Jeff had time to read it fairly quickly and let me know within a couple of days that they liked the story and that they’re talking it for inclusion in the anthology! Hurrah! Full details of Gaslight Grotesque aren’t available yet, but the book is available on Amazon.com for pre-order here:

 http://www.amazon.com/Gaslight-Grotesque-Nightmare-Sherlock-Holmes/dp/1894063317/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244360116&sr=8-1

Looks good, doesn’t it? Charles and Jeff will presumably have some line edits to suggest, so my story may yet need some tweaks, but a good result all round I think. My critical circle, in particular, deserve some thanks for this one, for acting above and beyond the call of duty and getting me comments back under a tight (and entirely self-imposed!) timeframe. So, Messrs Duffy, Thorley, Worgan, Hadley, Marsh and Ms Inger-Monk, many thanks!

And talking of tight timeframes… My plan after submitting The Hand Delivered Letter was to spend a couple of weeks writing and redrafting my planned for submission for Danel Olsen’s Exotic Gothic 3 but, as ever, the best laid plans gang aft aglay, as it were. Danel got in touch to say that, due to circumstances beyond his control, the deadline for submissions had been brought forward. To this Monday.

Monday.

I have never written so much so fast! The story (still with a working title of Copperbelt, incidentally) was completed across the following 6 days, written mostly in the evening or early morning. It’s out for comment with the critical circle as I write this, so as long as they don’t pick it apart completely, I can do final edits on Monday morning and get it to Danel before the deadline. I might have news on this next week – fingers crossed…

Creature Feature - June 1st approaches!

Creature Feature - June 1st approaches!

Next on the agenda is sorting out the final edits of the stories for Strange Gateways, which I’ll have done by the end of the week. And don’t forget, Creature Feature is now available for pre-order! One of my friends has definitely ordered himself a copy, so what are the rest of you waiting for?

Reviews: Finally! At last! The long-awaited review of Joseph D’Lacey’s Garbage Man. And I’m sure the question you asked yourself right about now is, has it been worth the wait? Well, i don’t know about the review, but the answer about the book is an unequivocal ‘Yes’. Garbage Man is a well written, smart horror story about waste and wastage. D’Lacey sets up a vast, complex story and manages (for the most part) to control his characters well, giving them realistic and well-defined characters and although the central message (that mankind’s time on this planet may be nearing an end, and that we’re likely to in some way author our own demise) is a well-trodden one, it is delivered with enough style and panache to be original and engaging. D’Lacey doesn’t shy away from some genuinely shocking imagery (the stuff with the baby, in particular, is upsettingly grim). Essentially, this is the story of Mason Brand and some very, very irritable garbage, and it is to D’Lacey’s credit that what could have come across as silly never seems to be anything other than deadly serious and mostly believable. It’s not without its problems, though: there’s a shift in gear towards the end, leading to an apocalyptical climax, comes a little out of the blue, and then disappears just as quickly (which is a shame, as the scenes as the town under siege were among my favourite in the novel and I could have cheerfully read more). The actual end of the book does make sense, and is impressively bleak, but it does seem to happen very fast and seems almost an afterthought, which is a shame given the strength of what had come before. Plus, I hated the term Necrolith for the main garbage beast, as it felt just a little too author-smart for me, but that could just be a personal opinion! Overall, highly recommended.

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Fifteenth Time

May 30, 2009 at 12:20 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

I finally finished the story for submission to Charles Prepolec’s Gaslight Grotesque anthology. At the moment it’s in draft, but the feedback from the critical circle has been pretty good (better than anticipated) so I’m hopeful that Charles (and Jeff Campbell, the other editor and also a thoroughly nice fellow) will like it. The feedback has picked up on one or two things that need fixing with the story (nothing major), so the plan is to make the fixes this week and submit it by Friday if not earlier. Fingers crossed…

The other writing this week has been the story for submission to Danel Olsen’s Exotic Gothic III – a gothic story but not set in the traditional home of the gothic (the UK, Germany, Italy, France – basically western Europe!). I’ve been struggling with this for some time, trying to find a central peg to hang the story on. I knew what I wanted to do, sort of, but not quite how to do it, so this week I did a fun thing: I freewheeled through google. A while ago, I found a small document online about Zambian myths and cultures (I’m setting the story in Zambia for no reason other than an old family friend lives there and it’s certainly exotic in Gothic terms and i wanted to write a completely sunlit horror story )so I used one Zambian word from it to search and read what came up, took one Zambian term from one of the search results and searched for that, etc, and disappeared into Google’s merry depths. I ended up with an academic paper about a particular myth, a travel blog about a sort of beer made from corn and a weird little ‘my God’s better than your God’ blog by a kid in Africa, and somewhere in the middle of that, the story appeared. It’s not fully formed yet, but I have an opening couple of sentences that seem to work, an idea of where it’s going and a series of what feel to me like good, creepy images to incorporate. It’s working title is Copperbelt and I hope to have it written in draft during next week. Then it’s off to the critical circle and the nervous ‘awaiting comments’ period. I need it done in final version and submitted by June 20th, so I’ve left this one a bit late. Oops…

Creature Feature - June 1st approaches!

Creature Feature - June 1st approaches!

Final news this week: the full contents for Creature Feature have been released! The list is an exciting one, especially for me as three stories of mine are in there!

Guy N Smith – The Fish Thing
Guy N Smith – The Beast in the Mist
William Meikle – Rickmans’ Plasma
William Meikle – Stingers
Simon Kurt Unsworth – Day Ten
Simon Kurt Unsworth – Last Option
Simon Kurt Unsworth – Peek-a-Boo
Maxwell Dowie – Late Shift
Ian Faulkner – Sun
Barry J. House – Opening Night
David Jeffery – It Lives In Dark Places
Steve Jensen – The Devil Of Mons
Rakie Keig – The Moths That Ate New Jersey
Steven Lockley – The Flies
Kevin Lumley – Le Carcajou
Peter Mark May – Wookey Hole
David McAfee – Lakeside
Robert Morrish – Each Step I Take Is In Darkness
Stuart Neild – Old Slippery
Daniel I. Russell – Belvedere
Brooke Vaughn – Creeper

Details of how to order, cost, etc, can be found by following the link to the Ghostwriter Blog in the blogroll at the side of this page.

My other Ghostwriter projects are progressing well. Black Dogs and Lost Places  is pretty much in the bag. Barbara R is nearly through reading the stories and tells me she’s enjoying them so far (thank God!), so the intro is on its way. I need to chase the outstanding blurbs, but that’s no hassle really. The mini, limited collection, Strange Gateways, is on track as well. I have to do final edits on the stories and order them, but that should be easy enough and will only take a day or two. It’s definitely looking like a July release, and it will be a numbered paperback limited to 100 copies. Start saving those pennies now…

Reviews: The Birthing House by Christopher Ransom. Oh. Dear. Me. Not a bad book, exactly, but not good. It’s one of those iritating books that presents itself as a haunted house book, but then never really commits to the supernatural and bounces around the ‘is it maybe the main character’s madness’ motif as a story driver. It’s mostly well written, although the characterisation is poor and the characters mostly unbelievable, and the ending veers dangerously close to cliche. One to get out of the library, but not to buy.

I also watched the older movie The Woman in Black, based on the book by Susan Hill and written for the screen by Nigel Kneale (of Quatermass fame). This is a great movie, both creepy and upsetting, and it’s an object lesson in how to make creepy imagery without a massive budget or special effects. The sight of the woman in the abandoned graveyard will send shivers down your spine! Copies still turn up on ebay, so I’d urge you to track one down if you can.

Okay, there’s writing to be done and tasks to be completed. Until next week, Lords and Ladies, goodbye.

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